Critique of Nonviolent Politics
 

 

Critique of Nonviolent Politics
From Mahatma Gandhi to the Anti-Nuclear Movement

Ryan, Howard
http://www.connexions.org/CxLibrary/Docs/CX9124-Ryan-CritiqueofNonviolentPolitics02.pdf
http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/sts/bmartin/pubs/peace/02Ryan.pdf

Year Published:  2002   First Published:  1984
Pages:  174pp  
Resource Type:  Book
Cx Number:  CX9124

Ryan accepts that sometimes nonviolence can be effective, but says that sometimes it is not: "a principled insistence on nonviolence can in some circumstances be dangerous to progressive social movements." He says that nonviolence theory "is troubled by moral dogma and mechanical logic."

Abstract: 
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Table of Contents

Preface

Part I Problems of Nonviolent Theory
1 Nonviolent Philosophy
2 Moral View: Violence Itself Is Wrong
3 Practical View: Violence Begets Violence
4 Nonviolent Theory of Power
5 Voluntary Suffering
6 Common Nonviolent Arguments
7 A Class Perspective

Part II Gandhi: A Critical History
8 Father of Nonviolence
9 Satyagraha in South Africa
10 Textile Strike
11 Noncooperation Movement 1919-22
12 Religious Conflicts
13 Salt Satyagraha
14 Congress Ministries
15 The War Years
16 Independence and Bloodshed

Part III Nonviolence in the Anti-Nuclear Movement
17 Nonviolent Direct Action
18 Consensus Decision Making
19 Open, Friendly, and Respectful
20 Civil Disobedience

Epilogue

Notes

Subject Headings

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