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Postmodernism Generator

Bulhak, Andrew C.
http://www.elsewhere.org/pomo/

First Published:  2000
Resource Type:  Website
Cx Number:  CX8316

A computer program written by Andrew. C. Bulhak using the Dada Engine, a system for generating random text. Each time you click on the page, it generates a brand-new postmodernist essay, completely meaningless, but superficially plausible, just like 'real' postmodernist essays.

Abstract:  Sample essay produced by the Postmodernism Generator:

Modern Narratives: Social realism, Derridaist reading and rationalism

Linda N. von Junz
Department of Sociology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Ludwig C. D. Tilton
Department of Literature, Carnegie-Mellon University


1. Tarantino and neocultural construction

The primary theme of the works of Tarantino is not desublimation, but predesublimation. The subject is contextualised into a dialectic that includes consciousness as a whole.

In the works of Tarantino, a predominant concept is the distinction between within and without. But Lacanist obscurity states that sexual identity has significance. De Selby[1] holds that we have to choose between semioticist predialectic theory and modernist deappropriation.

Thus, Debord suggests the use of Lacanist obscurity to modify art. An abundance of discourses concerning postcultural patriarchialist theory may be found.

However, the premise of social realism suggests that truth is part of the futility of narrativity. The destruction/creation distinction intrinsic to Burroughs's Port of Saints emerges again in The Ticket that Exploded.

It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a neocapitalist paradigm of expression that includes art as a paradox. The characteristic theme of Cameron's[2] analysis of neocultural construction is a mythopoetical totality.

Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a that includes sexuality as a reality. Derrida uses the term "the postconstructive paradigm of narrative" to denote the bridge between class and sexual identity.


2. Neocultural construction and capitalist materialism

If one examines capitalist materialism, one is faced with a choice: either accept neocultural construction or conclude that context is created by the masses, given that art is interchangeable with narrativity. But Bataille's essay on social realism states that class, somewhat paradoxically, has objective value. If neocultural construction holds, we have to choose between neomaterialist capitalist theory and postdeconstructive deappropriation.

The main theme of the works of Burroughs is the rubicon of capitalist society. Therefore, the characteristic theme of von Ludwig's[3] analysis of social realism is a predialectic paradox. Drucker[4] implies that the works of Burroughs are modernistic.

In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of textual sexuality. However, several theories concerning the role of the writer as reader exist. The premise of neocultural construction suggests that the task of the observer is deconstruction, but only if Bataille's model of social realism is invalid; otherwise, class has intrinsic meaning.

If one examines neocultural construction, one is faced with a choice: either reject prematerialist construction or conclude that art is used to entrench class divisions, given that narrativity is equal to consciousness. Therefore, Foucault promotes the use of social realism to attack hierarchy. The example of neocultural construction depicted in Burroughs's Naked Lunch is also evident in The Last Words of Dutch Schultz, although in a more mythopoetical sense.

However, the primary theme of the works of Burroughs is not, in fact, theory, but neotheory. Baudrillard suggests the use of Sartreist existentialism to analyse and modify culture.

But the subject is interpolated into a that includes sexuality as a whole. Any number of discourses concerning neocultural construction may be discovered.

Thus, the premise of social realism states that the State is elitist. The subject is contextualised into a that includes language as a totality.

It could be said that the main theme of Brophy's[5] critique of capitalist materialism is a semantic paradox. The subject is interpolated into a that includes culture as a reality.

Thus, the primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the difference between class and narrativity. Many sublimations concerning not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but prenarrative exist.

But if social realism holds, the works of Pynchon are not postmodern. The subject is contextualised into a that includes truth as a whole.


1. de Selby, O. J. ed. (1996) Social realism in the works of Burroughs. Schlangekraft

2. Cameron, W. (1970) The Economy of Sexual identity: Social realism and neocultural construction. O'Reilly & Associates

3. von Ludwig, Q. R. C. ed. (1989) Social realism in the works of McLaren. Loompanics

4. Drucker, V. A. (1978) Forgetting Derrida: Neocultural construction and social realism. Schlangekraft

5. Brophy, B. ed. (1996) Neocultural construction in the works of Pynchon. Panic Button Books

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