La Social-Democracie et les militants chretiens; texte-outil no. 6

Renaud, Gilbert; Vaillancourt, Yves
Publisher:  Resau des Politeses Chretiens, Montreal, Canada
Year Published:  1978  
Pages:  144pp  
Resource Type:  Book
Cx Number:  CX794

This study is prepared for militant christens engaged in the Quebec worker movement. It provides a history of social democracy in Europe through the early part of this century tracing the three stages of its rejection by marxists as a form of revisionism. The study continues with an analysis of the political history of militant Christians in Quebec from 1960 to the present. Here, the authors outline four stages.

Abstract:  This study is prepared for militant christens engaged in the Quebec worker movement. It provides a history of social democracy in Europe through the early part of this century tracing the three stages of its rejection by marxists as a form of revisionism. The study continues with an analysis of the political history of militant Christians in Quebec from 1960 to the present. Here, the authors outline four stages:
1) The Quiet Revolution. With the Liberals in power, the Left oriented to them partly in rejection of the DuPlessis period. The church found itself largely disestablished in spite of its resistance. Catholic Action was quickest to adapt to the new situation.
2) Social Democracy. As the Quiet Revolution ended and the Trudeau clan entered Ottawa, the P.Q. was formed as well as many citizens' groups. The labour movement was radicalized. Meanwhile the Church was absorbed in digesting the implications of the Quite Resolution, and Vatican II. Some dioceses and religious communities made their first steps into the workers' Movement.
3) Marxism as an Instrument of Analysis. As the economy stagnated in 1971 - 1973 there was a widespread interest in studying Marxism. Politicized "support groups" sprang up everywhere. The Left became disillusioned with the Parti Quebecois lack of support for workers. Within the church, there arose the phenomenon of the hard core social Democrat who saw his role as braking any movement towards Marxism.
4) Marxism as a Guide to Action. In the last four years there is evidence that not the workers' movement but small groups of Christians have begun to base their political action on Marxist principles. The various political factions of the Left in Quebec are outlined .
The authors believe it is important, both in political life and in the workers' movement as well as in the Church to keep lines of communication open between those finding their way through the social democratic experience and militant Christians.

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