Perspectives on World Hunger

Publisher:  The St. John's Oxfam Committee, P.O. Box 18000, St. John's, Newfoundland
Year Published:  1981  
Pages:  18pp  
Resource Type:  Book
Cx Number:  CX2313

This curriculum unit is designed to introduce senior high school students in Newfoundland to the problem of widespread malnutrition in the world.

Abstract:  This curriculum unit is designed to introduce senior high school students in Newfoundland to the problem of widespread malnutrition in the world. The objective of the unit is to give teachers and students sufficient data and analysis to answer basic questions about food and hunger: Where do people who go hungry live? Why is there not enough food for everyone? Are there too many children in the world? What can be done to bring an end to the "food crisis"?

Each lesson contains a lesson plan and a list of resource materials (articles, stories, cartoons, fact sheets, etc.). The lesson plans analyze the essential issues raised in the resource material, with indications of how they may be discussed in class. They also contain recommendations for audio-visual presentations, discussion questions and class projects.

The introductory lesson explains the fundamental context of social, economic and political relations in which problems of malnutrition appear. It defines such concepts as "development", "underdevelopment", and "the third world", and examines the historical process by which certain communities came to be underdeveloped. While this and subsequent lessons deal primarily with the severe problems of Africa, Asia and Latin America, there are examples of problems in Newfoundland and Canada to give students a familiar point of reference.

After the core lesson, the unit covers the following topics: Nutrition and Malnutrition; Land Use and Food Trade; Corporations and the Food Supply; Population and Hunger; Foreign Aid and What Can Be Done? Each topic is sufficiently complete to warrant study in itself; the topics are nonetheless related and there is a common theme running throughout the lessons, namely, widespread hunger on a global scale is a result of prevailing economic and social structures, at both domestic and international levels.

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